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The Radical Iran

Members within Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s own party are trying to contain his radical ways.

The AP has more:

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) – Critics say the 1980s-style radicalism of ultraconservative President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is hurting Iran at home and abroad – to the point that even his natural allies in parliament have rejected his three choices to run the all-important oil ministry.

The Islamic hard-liner appears undeterred, but pragmatists in the ruling hierarchy are growing restless and looking for ways to contain him.

“Ahmadinejad’s behavior has annoyed many fellow conservatives. That he doesn’t like to consult with anybody outside his small circle of old friends is a reality,” said Ghodratollah Rahmani, a conservative writer.

“He doesn’t consult even with knowledgeable people in his own camp.”

Even extremists within the hard-line camp want Ahmadinejad to be more responsive to their advice.

This can’t mean good news for democracy in the country. As the article mentioned, even extremists want him to calm down.

Jeezus, this can’t be good for freedom…

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  • BrianOfAtlanta

    I would be much more concerned if the hard liners were lining up behind him. Iran is a mess politically these days, but why are these developments bad news? Iran’s government gives much too much power to the presidency, but we’ve known this for years. Seems to me we should be thankful that Iran’s government is implementing its own internal checks and balances, feeble though they may be.

  • http://www.kozoru.com Justin Gardner

    Seems to me we should be thankful that Iran’s government is implementing its own internal checks and balances, feeble though they may be.

    Well sure, but what does it say about the electorate? And how have our policies effected the power grabs of hardliners like these? It occurs to me that people in neighboring Islamic countries seem more and more nervous at the prospect of being invaded, so they’re voting guys like this in to protect them.

    An unfortunate side effect from the WOT?

  • http://Donlephant Leon

    What we are seeing in Iran is an attemp by the pro revelutionaries to continue the revolutionary ides of “Khomeini”. The revolutinary gaurds, the Cleric appointed supreme council, and the President. It started with the voting in of the last president by the people for a relaxation of some of the strictures put on them since the revolution to be governed more domacratically. This made the governmental institution is Iran afraid that he country was being taken over by more moderate aspects politically who wanted a greater relationship with the west. The ones in power in Iran is making changes to keep a hold on their positions of power in the country. So now there’s a purge of moderate politicians and reformers being fired and pulled from postions of change.Iran has always wanted to be a major if not the major force in the middleeast. Besides the nuclear issues, there’s also Irans intentions on the country it borders ….Iraq. Both countries have a large and dominate population of Shites. For Iraq to become weakened and left alone at this time would be disastrous.

  • http://probligo.blogspot.com probligo

    “Besides the nuclear issues, there’s also Irans intentions on the country it borders ….Iraq. Both countries have a large and dominate population of Shites. For Iraq to become weakened and left alone at this time would be disastrous”

    Right idea, wrong song.

    Iraq and Iran will end up together, I am convinced of that. Not as a military takeover. That would be stupid.

    It will come, after the US leaves, as the Iraqi government starts to show its true colours; as the Kurds demands for their homeland get more strident and demanding. It will come, twin sister Shia states.

    How come? Take a look through the bio’s of the leading lights in Iraq’s current puppet show…

  • http://www.kozoru.com Justin Gardner

    It will come, after the US leaves, as the Iraqi government starts to show its true colours; as the Kurds demands for their homeland get more strident and demanding. It will come, twin sister Shia states.

    How come? Take a look through the bio’s of the leading lights in Iraq’s current puppet show…

    This is certainly my concern.

    What could be seen as “progress” in some circles is not in my estimation…

  • Jeremy

    Truth is we don’t know what the hell is going to happen. We’ve got all sorts of ideas but we just don’t know. One thing is for sure, the Middle-East is in worse
    shape than it was before we decided to play “Occupy Iraq.”

    I hope one very important lesson is learned from this stain of a war, and that is just because you have the quote “most powerful military” in the world and lots of American dollars to throw at any problem that arises it doesn’t buy us a solution. This is why you don’t elect presidents for their corporate ties, i.e. Bush. Because once they obtain the reigns of power they treat our government like a shareholder’s meeting.

    America needs money like any other nation but money should not BE America. This country has become nothing more than another means to obtain money. When this planet is near death, which, let me assure you, isn’t too far away now, Money isn’t going to buy us sh.it!