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Clinton Wins Big In Puerto Rico

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By more than 2 to 1…

The cable networks called the island territory for Clinton the instant polls closed at 3:00 p.m., indicating a landslide; exit polls showed her winning virtually every group, including young voters typically loyal to nomination rival Barack Obama.

“I am overwhelmed by this vote today,” Clinton said in her victory speech. She used the speech to press the case that she’s proven her superior electability by pulling more popular votes than Obama.

She said more people have voted for her “than for any candidate in the history of presidential primaries. We are winning the popular vote.”

But is she really winning the popular vote? Because let’s remember that Clinton isn’t counting four caucus states that don’t report popular vote. With those, Obama is ahead by about 44,000 votes. Obviously this isn’t a large margin, but for her to claim outright that she leads the popular vote is misleading at best.

Right now the delegate count (according to Real Clear Politics) stands at…

Obama – 2,068
Clinton – 1,914

So Obama needs 50 to reach the new number of 2,118. The primaries on Tuesday should bring him within 20 35 of that total.

So…will more than 20 35 superdelegates stand up and stop this or will they wait until the convention?

More as it develops…

  • http://52novels.com Rob in Denver

    During CNN’s coverage of the RBC on Saturday, someone in the studio mentioned that a bunch of supers are waiting for the end of the primaries and mentioned we could see a gob of them June 4 and June 5.

    I’m betting that Obama will have the nomination by the end of this weekend.

  • http://stubbornfacts.us/ Tully

    *But is she really winning the popular vote? Because let’s remember that Clinton isn’t counting four caucus states that don’t report popular vote. With those, Obama is ahead by about 44,000 votes.?*

    Problem for Obama being that those four caucus results weren’t votes, and the numbers are only estimates of the number participating apportioned by delegate wins. And WA actually DID have a primary, even if it didn’t really count for delegate selection. But the problem for Clinton is that the popular vote just doesn’t count. The popular-vote argument here is just a talking point speaking to electability, and a 0.2% difference isn’t much of a lever there.

    She’s using the rhetoric of popular/populist democracy to boost her standing and bolster her case, in a Democratic nomination process that is only vaguely democratic at best. Legitimate tactic–but highly unlikely to work for her in getting the nomination, barring a *major* Obama implosion between now and the convention.

  • wj

    What fascinates me is the willingness of the Clinton campaign to discount anything resembling popular votes from caucus states, while happily counting popular votes from Puerto Rico…which will have no vote in the general election. I can understand why they would want to, of course. But one has to wonder: what kind of logic/rationalization they are using for it.